Cecil Reid: Local Hero

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anthony.brown
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Cecil Reid: Local Hero

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Better remembered in Hitchin as a talented cricket player (see Reginald Hine's History of Hitchin), Cecil Frederick Reid (c1842- 23 Aug 1898) was also a top footballer in his youth, playing about 44 games and scoring three goals for the legendary Wanderers FC, albeit just before their FA Cup successes.
The son of William Reid of The Node, Welwyn, a partner in the Reid brewery company, he attended Harrow School where he appeared for their cricket XI.
Along with Robert Dalrymple Elphinstone, another Harrovian, he brought scratch teams of (mainly) his Wanderers' team mates down from London to play in Hitchin F. C's first games, on 24th February 1866 and 17th March 1866, playing against Hitchin in the latter. He also played for Hitchin v Old Harrovians on 9th March 1867 and captained Welwyn F. C against Hitchin F.C, whilst still at Wanderers.
He was well known at Wanderers as their legendary 'high kicker'. He was a back who could send the ball long and high.
Born in Codicote about March 1842
Baptised Codicote 27th March 1842
1851 Census at school in 21, Portland Place, Brighton.
1861 Census at The Node, Codicote, near Hitchin. Father William Reid, Esq. Mother Louisa Margaret Reid, two brothers and three sisters.
23 May 1861 Matriculates. Studies at Christ Church, Oxford University.
3rd December 1862 Played for Old Harrovians as his team beat 'Cantabs' (Trinity College) 3-0. (Harrow School Rules)
13th March 1869 Played for Hitchin FC v Clapham Rovers (D 0-0)
23rd June 1869 at Pebmarsh Church in Essex, he married Charlotte Mary Harbottle Grimston, the daughter of a former St Albans M. P.
11th November 1871 Captained Hitchin F. C. v Crystal Palace, a 0-0 draw in the first round of the first ever FA Cup.
1881 Census at Overhall Road, Colne Engaine, Halstead, Essex. Partner in brewery. Daughters Evelyn Maud and Sybil Beatrice. Also a cook, two housemaids, a parlour maid, and a kitchen maid.
1891 Census at 30, Collingham Gardens, Kensington. Partner in Reid's Brewery. Wife, two daughters, a cook, a lady's maid, a parlour maid, two housemaids and a kitchen maid.
Died 23rd August 1898 in Sidmouth, Devon.
At the time of his death he was a partner in Reid's Brewery Co.
Details of his time at Harrow School can be found in The Harrow School Register 1800-1911.
Last edited by anthony.brown on Thu Sep 17, 2020 3:05 pm, edited 5 times in total.



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anthony.brown
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Re: Cecil Reid: Local Hero

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A HAPPY DAY AT CODICOTE
On Monday, 19th July (1869), an exciting scene as is seldom to be met with even in 'Merry England', took place at Codicote, and will remain for many a long day impressed on the minds of those who were fortunate enough to pass that way.
The cause of the rejoicing was the return of Mr Cecil Reid to his mother's house, The Node, near Codicote, accompanied by his bride. It is well known all over Hertfordshire how great a favourite the late Mr (William) Reid was with all classes in the county, and it may well be believed, that nearer home, where he was better known, he was even more beloved; and Mrs Reid, from her kind manner, and her generosity to her poorer neighbours, gains all hearts. Mr Cecil Reid, their eldest living son, has much of his father's kind ways, and having been born at The Node, and passed much time there, the inhabitants of Codicote and the neighbourhood had determined to prove to him how well he was appreciated by them.
On the 23rd of June last, Mr Cecil Reid was married to Miss Charlotte Grimston, eldest daughter of the Hon. and Rev. Edward Grimston, of Pebmarsh, in Essex; after passing some time in the Isle of Wight, and paying a visit to the bride's family, they were now on the road to The Node, on a visit to the bridegroom's mother.
As early as three in the morning the place was alive, and preparations were set on foot to decorate the street from end to end. As all hands went to work with a will, and 'love's labour' soon gets on, it was in an incredibly short space that seven triumphal arches were raised; each being the work of the person at whose door it stood. The first on entering from the side of the Welwyn station, was in front of Mr Tong's house. It was, as may be said of the other six, a most elegant structure, and bearing the inscription 'Welcome Home'. The second, at the house of Mr Pointon, greeted them with 'May blessings attend you'. Mr Coleman wished them 'Health and Happiness'. Mr Roberts and Mr Walbey, when erecting the fourth arch, wished 'Long life to the bride and bridegroom'. At the gate of the vicarage stood the fifth arch, the joint production of the family of Mrs Busk, of Codicote Lodge, and that of the Rev. T. H. Sharpe; it bore the words 'Marriage Blessings', and the letters 'C. R.' on either side; on a bank on the left side, and at the foot of this arch, were placed the little girls from the school, each with a pink and white flag; on the right side were the little boys, with flags of blue and white. Mr Cain on the sixth arch had put the letters 'C. R.' and 'May you be happy'. At a short distance from the Node, and half-a-mile from the village, stood the seventh and last arch, placed there by the family of Mr Bigg bearing the word 'Welcome'.
As the hour approached at which the newly married couple were expected, the village was alive with horsemen, as an escort was to form, and follow them for the rest of the journey, and no less than twenty-six of the neighbouring farmers were collected for this purpose. A little before five, the open carriage, containing the happy pair, came in sight, when the church bells sent out a real merry peal, and a loud cheer rose, which could have been heard at any distance, as at least three hundred persons took part in it. And now the scene became really exciting, for the horses being taken out, the carriage was seized by some sixty pairs of stalwart arms, and ropes being attached, was drawn away at a quick pace, the mounted men falling in behind - a gayer sight could not be seen, nor one calculated to gratify the feelings of the pair in whose honour it was enacted. The weather, though not so hot as it had been, was still far from cool, and it would have (one would have thought) contented less active and manly fellows to have drawn the carriage through the street; but this did not suit the views of Mr Reid's admirers, so off they set at a real brisk pace, and without once changing hands, drew the now laughing pair all the way to The Node, at least a mile and a half.
When arrived at the door, at which they pulled up in real good style, Mr Tom George Sharpe, who took a prominent part in all the proceedings, addressed a few words of welcome, in the name of all, to Mr and Mrs Reid, who thanked them briefly but very heartily for their warm reception.
Such cheering, laughing, and pulling, must needs cause dry throats. So thought Mr Hutchins, the butler at The Node, and Mr Cecil Reid being a prime favourite for him, he felt more than ordinary good will for those who treated him to such a grand ovation; so whilst the happy crowd came toiling down the road, he, with the hearty sanction of the lady of the house, ran to the cellar, and with plenty of help, began to draw cans of stout, and to extract corks from sherry bottles, whilst the housekeeper produced her bread and cheese. All was placed ready in a cricket tent (which stood near for next week's matches) by the time the thirsty souls reached the house, and a couple of hours were passed in merriment and games. All went well and in order, and by seven o'clock all was still, save the distant sound of the merry church bells.
Hertfordshire Express Saturday 24th July 1869

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Re: Cecil Reid: Local Hero

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At today's match I was asked to repeat this for a supporter who was unable to find details about Cecil Reid and his connection with Reid's Brewery, which joined with Watney's and Combes' Breweries...

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